Projects

A Worldview in Words: Lexical Categories of the Mopan Maya Soundscape Architecture Leonardo Da Vinci and his Treatise on Painting Digital Yoknapatawpha Arapesh Grammar and Digital Language Archive Chaco Research Archive: Building an International Resource SNAC: The Social Networks and Archival Context Project The Countryside Transformed: The Railroad and the Eastern Shore of Virginia, 1870-1935 The Digital Montpelier Project Collective Biographies of Women Historical Architecture of Minnesota Virtual Williamsburg The World's Fair in Italy Project Silk Road: The Path of Transmission of Avalokitesvara Xiakou : Moral Landscape in a Sichuan Mountain Village The Dresser Trunk Project: A spatial look at segregated travel Rome Reborn Mapping the Dalai Lamas The World of Dante English Medieval Architecture: A Model for Design Process Analysis Aquae Urbis Romae Homer's Trojan Theater The Lives of Saints : The Medieval French Hagiography Project St. Gall Monastery Plan The Vivarium Digital Library of Latin Literature Digital Roman Forum The Circus in America: 1793-1940 Traditions of Exemplary Women: Liu Xiang's Lienü  zhuan The Ukrainian Village Project Evolutionary Infrastructure: Boston's Back Bay Fens The Salem Witch Trials, Documentary Archive and Transcription Project The Samantabhadra Project The Thomas MacGreevy Archive Uncle Tom's Cabin and American Culture : Multimedia Archive The Salisbury Project The Melville Electronic Library Patterns of Reconstruction at Pompeii Monuments and Dust: The Culture of Victorian London The Walt Whitman Archive Inscriptions from the Land of Israel The Architecture of Thomas Jefferson Documentary History of the Construction of the Buildings at the University of Virginia The Mayan Epigraphic Database Project A New Interpretive Study of the Evolution of Slavery in Hellenistic and Roman Greece Wax, or The Discovery of Television Among the Bees The Hierarchical Audio Construction Kit: Composition and Design Noun Classification in Swahili Piers Plowman  Electronic Archive The William Blake Archive The Pompeii Forum Project Dickinson Electronic Archives The Complete Writings and Pictures of Dante Gabriel Rossetti The Valley of the Shadow
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Fellowship start dates
Project subjects
A Worldview in Words: Lexical Categories of the Mopan Maya
A Worldview in Words: Lexical Categories of the Mopan Maya
Danziger, Eve - Associate Professor of Linguistic Anthropology
Resident Fellowship: 2013-2014
The Lexical Categories of the Mopan Maya encompasses a multimedia archive of Mopan Maya texts. Mopan is the only surviving member of its branch of the Yucatan subfamily, one of two Mayan subfamilies associated with Classic Maya of antiquity. Prof. Danziger's collection of recordings will vastly expand and diversity the available corpus of Mopan language material and allow her to examine how the language fits into or challenges current linguistic theory.
Soundscape Architecture
Soundscape Architecture
Van Lengen, Karen - Jr. Professor of Architecture
Fellow 2012
This project focuses on the aural character of buildings through web-based demonstrations and analysis of the visual, auditory, and material aspects of architectural space. Sonic aspects of buildings, whether intentional or not, change the experience of being in a space, adding richness and depth, affecting orientation, or creating spots of isolation and silence.
Leonardo Da Vinci and his Treatise on Painting
Leonardo Da Vinci and his Treatise on Painting
Fiorani, Francesca - Associate Professor
Kress Foundation: 2009-2012
The main scope of the project is the creation of an electronically based archive for a comparative search of the textural and graphic tradition connected to Leonardo's Treatise on Painting, The only text by Leonardo that circulated widely from the mid-sixteenth century to the late eighteenth century.
Digital Yoknapatawpha
Digital Yoknapatawpha
Railton, Stephen - Professor
Associate Fellow
The project centers on William Faulkner's 15 novels and 48 stories, written between 1926 and 1960 and set in the mythical Mississippi county of Yoknapatawpha. The prototype models a way to enter every character, location and event from the individual texts into a robust database and then to map that data into an atlas of interactive visual resources, so that users can better understand and study the acts of narrative re-creation Faulkner undertook, according to the demands of a particular story. The project ultimately aims to link the entire body of Yoknapatawpha fictions together and dynamically generate new, cumulative maps. These will enable scholars or students to study, for example, all black inhabitants and the roles they play in his texts, or Faulkner's representations of violence, or religion, or family.
Arapesh Grammar and Digital Language Archive
Arapesh Grammar and Digital Language Archive
Dobrin, Lise - Associate Professor
Fellowship: 2011
The project will create a rich digital repository of sound recordings, text, and grammatical information about the endangered Arapesh family of languages, which are known to linguistic science for their unusual sound-based noun classification and agreement systems. Traditionally spoken by people living along the New Guinea north coast, in many villages Arapesh is no longer being learned by children, who grow up speaking the local lingua franca Tok Pisin instead. In addition to ensuring that Arapesh is preserved in a robust form for future generations, the Digital Language Archive will serve as a research tool for the other part of Dobrin's project, producing a written grammar of Arapesh focusing on the Cemaun dialect. A multilingual, multimedia web site will also be developed to provide the public with an accessible resource on this remarkable group of languages.
Chaco Research Archive: Building an International Resource
Chaco Research Archive: Building an International Resource
Plog, Stephen - Commonwealth Professor of Anthropology
Mellon Foundation: 2003-2011
The goal of the Chaco archive is to electronically integrate the widely dispersed information on Chacoan history in order to allow scholars to more effectively and efficiently address the many unresolved issues regarding culture change and organization in the canyon and in the broader region. These issues have broader implications as well since they are central to achieving a better understanding of Pueblo history throughout the Southwest and to more broadly studying the nature of human sociopolitical organization and change.
SNAC: The Social Networks and Archival Context Project
SNAC: The Social Networks and Archival Context Project
Pitti, Daniel - Co-Director of IATH
Co-Director, IATH
Address the ongoing challenge of transforming description of and improving access to primary humanities resources through the use of advanced technologies.
The Countryside Transformed: The Railroad and the Eastern Shore of Virginia, 1870-1935
The Countryside Transformed: The Railroad and the Eastern Shore of Virginia, 1870-1935
Barnes, Brooks Miles - Librarian, Eastern Shore Public Library
Martin, Worthy - Acting Director, IATH and Associate Professor of Computer Science
Ross, Douglas - Information Technology Specialist II
Externally funded project
A digital archive of maps, photographs, manuscripts, newspapers, public documents, and other media. "The Countryside Transformed" shows how the coming in 1884 of the railroad to the counties of Accomack and Northampton profoundly changed the physical and mental landscapes in which the people of the region lived, worked, and traveled.
The Digital Montpelier Project
The Digital Montpelier Project
Hallock, Gardiner - Montpelier Director of Architectural Research
2010 NEH Fellow
Developed from information gathered during the dramatic restoration of the Montpelier Mansion, the Digital Montpelier Project features three models tracing the Mansion's evolution from its initial construction in ca. 1764 through to President Madison's final expansion in ca. 1812.
Collective Biographies of Women
Collective Biographies of Women
Booth, Alison - Professor
Resident Fellowship: 2010-2012
Promotes on-line collaborative research on nineteenth and twentieth century English-language collections of biographies of women, and will expand on Collective Biographies of Women: An Annotated Bibliography, a web site that examines more than 930 collections of women's biographies published between 1830-1940 in Britain and North America. These books, written by both men and women, cover a surprising range of subjects—historical and literary, biblical and legendary, martyrs and murderers, queens and reformers—and have much in common with the genres of popular fiction, self-help, and history.
Historical Architecture of Minnesota
Historical Architecture of Minnesota
Martin, Worthy - Acting Director, IATH and Associate Professor of Computer Science
Collaborative IATH and MHS Project
This collaboration between the Minnesota Historical Society and IATH will produce a series of digital models of historically significant buildings. The initial project will be a high quality 3D model of the Washburn A Mill and the surrounding Mill City area of Minneapolis in 1885. Following this work, IATH will create models of the historic Ft. Snelling building complex between 1820-1900.
Virtual Williamsburg
Virtual Williamsburg
Fischer, Lisa - Colonial Williamsburg
Horn, Jim - Colonial Williamsburg
Martin, Worthy - Acting Director, IATH and Associate Professor of Computer Science
Externally funded IATH project
The Virtual Williamsburg Project is a collaborative effort between IATH and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation to present Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1776, according to currently known information.
The World's Fair in Italy Project
The World's Fair in Italy Project
Della Coletta, Cristina - Professor of Italian, Associate Chair
Resident Fellowship: 2009-2011
The World's Fair in Italy Project will be the first digital archive devoted to analyzing the phenomenon of World's Fairs in Italy. The project will consist of three sections, corresponding to three distinctive construction phases. The initial phase will be devoted to the "fabulous exposition" of Turin 1911. Each section will consist of two components: a real-time simulation model allowing users to create their own virtual tours of sectors of the fairgrounds, and an interactive database containing extensive materials, data, and artifacts related to these World's Fairs. The World's Fair in Italy Project will offer a rich digital collection aimed at preserving the ephemeral world of Universal Expositions
Silk Road: The Path of Transmission of Avalokitesvara
Silk Road: The Path of Transmission of Avalokitesvara
Wong, Dorothy - Associate Professor
Resident Fellowship: 2008-2010
The Silk Road is a network of trade routes that provided a bridge between the east and the west. Although the eastern part of the routes had been in use for millennia, the opening of the Silk Road occurred during the first century BCE, when China secured control over the eastern section and began trading with the Roman Empire through intermediary states in Central Asia. Using the Silk Road as a spatial template, this project attempts to create a digital, interactive presentation that allows for comparison of representations of Avalokiteśvara across geographic areas and over time, in turn generating new understanding of how the cult of Avalokiteśvara spread throughout Asia.
Xiakou : Moral Landscape in a Sichuan Mountain Village
Xiakou : Moral Landscape in a Sichuan Mountain Village
Flower, John - ACLS Fellow
ACLS Fellow
This project explores the histories, beliefs, livelihoods, and local identities in Xiakou (sha-ko) Village, located in the mountains of Ya'an County, in western Sichuan Province of the People's Republic of China.The goal of the project is to understand Xiakou Village as an evolving cultural landscape, defined as the interwoven field of physical environment, historical memory, and moral agency, in which particular places gather a people's sense of themselves and serve as sources of belonging and identity.
The Dresser Trunk Project: A spatial look at segregated travel
The Dresser Trunk Project: A spatial look at segregated travel
Williams, William D. - Associate Professor of Architecture
Associate Fellow 2007
The Dresser Trunk Project documents eleven venues and cities along the Southern Crescent Line, currently run by Amtrak. The Southern Crescent runs from New York to New Orleans. These venues were places of refuge for black travelers during segregation. The research documents the hotels, nightclubs, and other destinations that were safe havens for black travelers during segregation. Many of the venues along the Crescent route no longer exist, while others are in various stages of neglect.The purpose of this project is to identify locations around the country, establish links between the different locations i.e. who traveled between where and when. Preserve images, stories and documents that tell the story of each location. Culminating in the creation of a clearinghouse of information for significant venues in the black business districts and communities. Scholars, music historians, preservationist, and community leaders will use the collection of these national treasures.
Rome Reborn
Rome Reborn
Frischer, Bernard - Professor of Art History & Classics
Principal Investigator
Rome Reborn 1.0 is the continuation of five centuries of research by scholars, architects and artists since the Renaissance who have attempted to restore the ruins of the ancient city with words, maps and images. "Rome Reborn 1.0" is a true 3D model that runs in real time. Users can navigate through the model with complete freedom, moving up, down, left and right at will. They can enter important public buildings such as the Roman Senate House, the Colosseum, or the Temple of Venus and Rome, the ancient city's largest place of worship.
Mapping the Dalai Lamas
Mapping the Dalai Lamas
Schaeffer, Kurtis - Associate Professor of Tibetan Buddhist Studies
Resident Fellowship: 2007-2009
Mapping the Dalai Lamas intends to integrate digital texts of classical Tibetan-language biographies with digital animated maps, timelines, and images to present significant events in the lives of the Dalai Lamas as well as to reveal hitherto unnoticed connections between biographical events, geographic location, social and historical context, and literary and rhetorical expression.
The World of Dante
The World of Dante
Parker, Deborah - Professor of Italian
Resident Fellowship: 1997 [2006]
The World of Dante offers a hypermedia environment for the study of the Inferno. This project is designed to appeal to the different purposes of a wide range of readers, not simply those with scholarly interests. This version of the Inferno is generated by software from a densely encoded electronic text. Unlike other versions of the poem presently online, this copy of the Inferno has been tagged using SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language).
English Medieval Architecture: A Model for Design Process Analysis
English Medieval Architecture: A Model for Design Process Analysis
Reilly, Lisa - Associate Professor
Resident Fellowship: 2006-2008
This project will explore the extent to which later medieval ecclesiastical architecture in England is determined by the fact that it is typically an addition to a pre-existing physical structure and how it is a response to cultural issues such as program, patronage and external stylistic influences. Multi-dimensional dynamic digital models will be developed for this investigation, which will be available on the web for those with an interest in the specific case studies as well as scholars concerned with developing new methodologies for research in architectural history.
Aquae Urbis Romae
Aquae Urbis Romae
Rinne, Katherine Wentworth - Independent Scholar
Resident Fellowship: 1998 [2006]
An interactive cartographic history of the relationship between hydrological and hydraulic systems and their impact on the urban development of Rome, Italy from 753 BC to the present day. Aquae Urbis Romae examines the intersection between natural hydrological elements such as springs, rain, streams, marshes, and the Tiber River, and tectonic hydraulic elements such as aqueducts, fountains, sewers, bridges, conduits, etc., that together create the water infrastructure system of Rome.
Homer's Trojan Theater
Homer's Trojan Theater
Clay, Jenny Strauss - William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor Classics
Associate Fellow 2006
This project argues for the centrality of vision in Homeric poetics and its importance both for the poet in constructing, and for his audience in comprehending, the course of his narrative. The Iliad's battle scenes, which take up a third of the poem, pose an exceptional challenge to a narrator. The poet in turn is able to translate his vision into words with such vividness and clarity that his audience can for its part imaginatively re-envision the Trojan plain on which the heroes fought and died. This project takes the text of the Iliad as its script, paying particular attention to spatial indications such as for example "left" and "right," and attempts to reconstruct the activity on the battlefield with the help of digital technology. Translating the poemÂ’s verbal account into a visual medium demonstrates not only the coherence of its plan, but also reveals the role of spatial design in plotting its narrative.
The Lives of Saints : The Medieval French Hagiography Project
The Lives of Saints : The Medieval French Hagiography Project
Ogden Amy - Associate Professor of French
Resident Fellowship: 2005-2007
The "Lives of the Saints" Project will focus on those Lives that were written in French (including Anglo-Norman but not Occitan), in verse or prose or both between c. 880 and 1504 of the Christian era. These texts (also known collectively as hagiography) were arguably the most widely enjoyed literary and religious works of the Middle Ages. Today, however, most of them languish in manuscript vaults and in faulty, rare, century-old editions; very few have been translated into modern French or English. One main goal of this project is to demonstrate both the central role of hagiography in medieval French culture and the inherent appeal of the works in order to stimulate further research, especially the preparation of editions and translations that will make the Lives accessible to all readers.
St. Gall Monastery Plan
St. Gall Monastery Plan
Frischer, Bernard - Professor of Art History & Classics
Geary, Pat - Professor of History, UCLA
Martin, Worthy - Acting Director, IATH and Associate Professor of Computer Science
Schedl, Barbara - Independent Scholar
Resident Research: 2005
This site will provide access to the results of our long-term project of creating an extensive collection of the Plan of St. Gall. In addition to a variety of digital representations of the plan itself, the collection will include detailed information on each element of the plan, its contemporary context and its impact on early medieval monastic architecture and culture. The resulting collection, as made available via this site, will have the breadth and depth of information that will enable substantive new scholarship. The Plan of St. Gall is the earliest preserved and most extraordinar visualization of a building complex produced in the Middle Ages. Ever since th Plan was created at the monastery of Reichenau sometime in the period 819-2 A.D., it has been preserved in the Monastic Library of St. Gall (Switzerland)
The Vivarium Digital Library of Latin Literature
The Vivarium Digital Library of Latin Literature
Nancy Llewellyn - Independent Scholar
Independent Scholar 2005-2006
The Vivarium Digital Library of Latin Literature is new kind of online library of Latin texts in which all periods of Latin literature will be represented and made accessible to a wider public. The texts themselves will act as portals, putting the user in instant contact with a universe of digital tools for interdisciplinary research, interpretation, study and teaching. The name Vivarium Digital Library was chosen by an international group of scholars working on the project to honor the original Vivarium, a unique library and cultural institution founded by the great 6th-century Italian philosopher and diplomat Cassiodorus.
Digital Roman Forum
Digital Roman Forum
Frischer, Bernard - Professor of Art History & Classics
Principal Investigator
The Cultural Virtual Reality Laboratory (CVRLab UCLA) created a digital model of the Roman Forum as it appeared in late antiquity. The notional date of the model is June 21, 400 A.D. The purpose of the modeling project was to spatialize information and theories about how the Forum looked at this moment in time, which was more or less the height of its development as Rome's civic and cultural center. The digital model includes over twenty features (buildings and major monuments) filling up the western zone of the Roman Forum from the Temple of Vesta and Temple of Antoninus and Faustina on the east to the Tabularium facing the western slope of the Capitoline Hill.
The Circus in America: 1793-1940
The Circus in America: 1793-1940
Hoh, LaVahn G. - Professor
Resident Fellowship: 2002-2004
The Circus In America, 1793 - 1940 examines the unique characteristics, cultural impact, and relationships in the development of the circus as one of the most popular and significant forms of entertainment in America. The site looks at the circus' transition from small performer operated shows into big business. As circuses grew so did the associated problems. The circus developed unique solutions to their problems and these solutions were adopted by other industries. Likewise, the circus learned valuable lessons from industry and used those ideas to their benefit. One prominent example was the switch from wagons to railroads for transporting the shows. The circus shared many of the recurring problems of theatre and vaudeville such as maintaining fresh shows with unique acts.
Traditions of Exemplary Women: Liu Xiang's Lienü zhuan
Traditions of Exemplary Women: Liu Xiang's Lienü  zhuan
Kinney, Anne Behnke - Professor of Chinese
Resident Fellowship: 2001
This project focuses on the Lienü zhuan (Traditions of Exemplary Women) of Liu Xiang (77-6 B.C.), the earliest extant book in the Chinese tradition solely devoted to the moral education of women. The book consists of biographical accounts of female role models in early China and became the standard textbook for women's education for the next two millennia. The Lienü zhuan offers important insights into the culture, politics, and social structure of early China, as well as into the representation of women in various phases of China's history. This project includes a translation of the text, a book-length study, and a digital archive that will serve as a publicly accessible tool for scholarly exploration (in both English and Chinese) of women's social, legal, and ritual status as represented in the texts of specific periods in Chinese history.
The Ukrainian Village Project
The Ukrainian Village Project
Kononenko, Natalie - Professor of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Folklore
Associate Fellowship: 2001
The Ukrainian Village Project seeks to present the folklore and ethnography of Ukraine. Folklore is the artistic expression of the most fundamental beliefs of a culture. It articulates ideas about the relationships among people and between humans and the world around them. It is the key to understanding a culture at the grassroots level. At present, the project focuses on material culture, namely a three-dimensional model of a real village house located in the village of Iavorivka, Drabivs'kyi raion, Cherkas'ka oblast, Ukraine and samples of costumes and ritual towels from the same region.
Evolutionary Infrastructure: Boston's Back Bay Fens
Evolutionary Infrastructure: Boston's Back Bay Fens
Poole, Kathy - Independent Scholar
Resident Fellowship: 2000
The case study is Boston's Back Bay Fens and its surrounding urban landscape. The Fens is an urban park designed in 1878 by legendary landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr., his inaugural jewel for the chain of parks dubbed the Emerald Necklace. It is also central to the planned districts ofBack Bay and the Fenway, critically important additions to Boston Enabled by a massive 19th c. landfill operation. Together the park and its neighborhoods form the Fens landscape, a model urban design.
The Salem Witch Trials, Documentary Archive and Transcription Project
The Salem Witch Trials, Documentary Archive and Transcription Project
Ray, Ben - Professor
Resident Fellowship: 2000
The Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive and Transcription Project consists of an electronic collection of primary source materials relating to the Salem witch trials of 1692 and a new transcription of the court records. The Documentary Archive is created under the supervision of Professor Benjamin C. Ray, University of Virginia. The Transcription project is supervised by Professor Bernard Rosenthal, University of Binghamton. Together with a team of scholars, Professor Rosenthal is undertaking a new transcription of the original court records, titled Records of the Salem Witch-Hunt, to be published by Cambridge University Press.
The Samantabhadra Project
The Samantabhadra Project
Germano, David - Associate Professor
Resident Fellowship: 1999
The Samantabhadra Collection is a collaborative electronic project centered around the reproduction, analysis, interpretation, and translation of Tibetan literature in the Nyingma tradition. The Nyingma (rnying ma) schools of Tibetan Buddhism represent the oldest lineages of Buddhism in Tibet, dating back to the eighth century during the height of the great Tibetan Empire and continuing to thrive in the twenty-first century. The Collection is named after Samantabhadra (Tibetan, kun tu bzang po), the primordial Buddha understood as the ultimate source of these traditions. Our initial focus is on the various editions of the great canonical collection of Tibetan Buddhist scriptures known as The Collected Tantras of the Ancients (rnying ma rgyud 'bum).
The Thomas MacGreevy Archive
The Thomas MacGreevy Archive
Schreibman, Susan - Assistant Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
Networked Associate Fellowship: 1999
The Thomas MacGreevy Archive is a long-term, interdisciplinary research project committed to exploring the intersections between traditional humanities research and digital technologies. To date, the Archive has focused on publishing an on-line bibliography of writings by and about Thomas MacGreevy. Over 300 texts, augmented with enhanced search and navigation features, have been encoded in Standard Generalised Markup language (SGML).
Uncle Tom's Cabin and American Culture : Multimedia Archive
Uncle Tom's Cabin and American Culture : Multimedia Archive
Railton, Stephen - Professor
Resident Fellowship: 1999
The project is founded on three premises. First as the best-selling novel and most frequently dramatized story in the 19th Century America, Uncle Tom's Cabin can teach us an enormous amount about our history and culture. No text has more to say about how American society has understood relations between the races, the meaning of slavery, the nature and place of women and men, the significance of Christians, the South as a region, and so on. Second, access to original texts and manuscripts of Stowe's work will enrich the learning experience and further an understanding of society during the 19th century. Third, modern electronic technology can give us powerful new ways to research and appreciate our past.
The Salisbury Project
The Salisbury Project
Roberts, Marion - Professor
Associate Fellowship: 2000
The Salisbury Project is the creation of Professor Marion Roberts, McIntire Department of Art, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. The Project is an archive of color photographs designed for teachers, students and scholars to supplement visually books and articles published on the cathedral and town of Salisbury. The project consists of views of the exterior and interior of the cathedral. Views of the choir have yet to be added. In the future the project will include photographs of the Close, the Town, Old Sarum and some Parish Churches. There is a guide for teachers and students, a section devoted to texts and essays, and an annotated bibliography.
The Melville Electronic Library
The Melville Electronic Library
Bryant, John - Professor, Hofstra University
Networked Associate Fellowship: 1998
In some ways it is true that we already know what Herman Melville wrote, and can find it in many bookstores and libraries. But, as with some other authors now being reedited electronically, much has actually lain concealed and can now be revealed. Because Melville's surviving manuscripts show versions and structures not even hinted at in most printed editions; because he himself suggested that print alone could not accomplish his goals; because some of his writing remains unpublished; and because we now look at texts differently than in the recent past seeing in them evidence of intellectual flux, social construction, and the workings of the marketplace the writings of Herman Melville call for electronic editing.
Patterns of Reconstruction at Pompeii
Patterns of Reconstruction at Pompeii
Martini, Kirk - Associate Professor of Architecture and Civil Engineering
Resident Fellowship: 1998
The Pompeii Forum Project, is a multi-disciplinary study of the development of the Forum as the civic center of Pompeii. The study is approached from the perspective of a structural engineer, applying engineering principles to interpret the currently visible areas of damage and repair, plus information available from historic records. The study employs a variety of computer-based technologies in the inquiry, in particular digital photogrammetry to document the geometry and construction of key areas of the building, plus three dimensional modelling to depict the state of the building in various states of damage and repair.
Monuments and Dust: The Culture of Victorian London
Monuments and Dust: The Culture of Victorian London
Levenson, Michael - William B. Christian Professor
Resident Fellowship: 1998
Subtitled "New Technologies and Sociologies of Research," the project seeks to extend both the terms and forms of the study of London, the dominant metropolis of the nineteenth century, a center of social and cultural meanings, and a resonant locus for interdisciplinary exchange. The large scale of the research endeavor will lead to the construction of an archive of primary materials-journalism, literary works, paintings, census data, maps, tracts, cartoons, sermons-open to scholars and teachers in a wide range of disciplines, and at the same time it will be the occasion for ongoing electronic publication, essays and books linked to the repository of artifacts. From the beginning of 1999 both the archive and the scholarship will appear on the internet under the sponsorship of Cambridge University Press.
The Walt Whitman Archive
The Walt Whitman Archive
Folsom, Ed - The Carver Professor of English at The University of Iowa
Price, Kenneth M. - The Hillegass Professor of American literature at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Networked Associate Fellows 1997
The Walt Whitman Archive is an electronic research and teaching tool that sets out to make Whitman's vast work, for the first time, easily and conveniently accessible to scholars, students, and general readers. Whitman, America's most influential poet and one of the four or five most innovative and significant writers in United States history, is the most challenging of all American authors in terms of the textual difficulties his work presents
Inscriptions from the Land of Israel
Inscriptions from the Land of Israel
Satlow, Michael -
Resident Fellowship: 1997
This project seeks to collect and make available all the inscriptions from the Land of Israel that date from the Hellenistic period (c. 330 BCE) through the Persian conquest (614 C.E.). These inscriptions were written and carved in stone (and other durable materials) and inlaid in mosaics. They were written in Hebrew, Aramaic, Latin, and Greek by Jews, Christians, and pagans. They include epitaphs, commemorations, mile markers, and acknowledgements of gifts.
The Architecture of Thomas Jefferson
The Architecture of Thomas Jefferson
Wilson, Richard Guy - The Commonwealth Professor's Chair in Architectural History at the University of Virginia
Resident Fellowship: 1996
Jefferson Architecture Electronic Archive Center (JAEAC) is an "in process" archive that brings together materials related to the architecture of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826). In spite of the near universal aclaim accorded to Jefferson's architecture no comprehensive publication exists that covers his work in detail. Working with curators from other institutions and Jefferson properties this archive will assemble both primary and major secondary materials.
Documentary History of the Construction of the Buildings at the University of Virginia
Documentary History of the Construction of the Buildings at the University of Virginia
Grizzard, Frank E., Jr. - Senior Associate Editor, The Papers of George Washington
Graduate Fellow 1996
This electronic database consists of 1,750 manuscript documents related to the construction of the original buildings of Thomas Jefferson's nineteenth-century architectural masterpiece, the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, Virginia. When completed, it will consist of transcriptions and annotations for the documents, nearly 3,000 digital images from microfilm and from originals for many of those documents, a book-length historical narrative based on those documents, and hundreds of digital photographs of the university's historic grounds. The analytical and textual components of the project are largely completed, and most of the material is already in a searchable electronic format, but the text encoding and hypertext links necessary to make this a fully integrated and searchable sgml database have not been completed. The database is now permanently maintained by the University of Virginia's Electronic Text Center
The Mayan Epigraphic Database Project
The Mayan Epigraphic Database Project
Alvarado, Rafael - Manager, Humanities Computing Research Support, Princeton University
Graduate Fellow 1996
The Mayan Epigraphic Database Project (MED) is an experiment in networked scholarship with the purpose of enhancing Classic Mayan epigraphic research. At present, MED consists of a relational database of glyphs ("gnumbers"), images, phonetic values ("pvalues"), and semantic values ("svalues") according to the consensus among various American Mayanists (MacLeod and Reents-Budet 1994). Also present is the beginning of an archive of digitally transcribed Mayan texts.
A New Interpretive Study of the Evolution of Slavery in Hellenistic and Roman Greece
A New Interpretive Study of the Evolution of Slavery in Hellenistic and Roman Greece
Meyer, Elizabeth A. - Associate Professor of History, Corcoran Department of History
Resident Fellowship: 1996
The overall long-term goal of this project is to create an electronic archive of all Greek manumission inscriptions that can be of use to epigraphists (scholars specializing in the study of ancient inscriptions) and historians (of antiquity, but also of slavery in other historical periods) alike.
Wax, or The Discovery of Television Among the Bees
Wax, or The Discovery of Television Among the Bees
Blair, David - Independent Filmmaker
Networked Associate Fellow 1995
"WAX or the discovery of television among the bees" (85:00, 1991), is a electronic-cinema feature. This hybrid feature, which can be called a film both from habit, and because modes of distribution necessitated a transfer to 16mm,is made completely of electronic images; the majority of it's 2000 shots were either digitally post-processed, or synthesized using analog and digital techniques.
The Hierarchical Audio Construction Kit: Composition and Design
The Hierarchical Audio Construction Kit: Composition and Design
Shatin, Judith - Director, Virginia Center for Computer Music
Associate Fellow 1995
The Hierarchical Audio Construction Kit (Hack) is a computer music language developed at the Virginia Center for Computer Music by Pete Yadlowsky. Judith Shatin's fellowship consisted of further development of Hack for compositional and pedagogical applications. Shatin used Hack when writing her oratorio COAL, scored for chorus, Appalachian ensemble, and electronics; and Elijah's Chariot, a piece scored for string quartet and electronics that was commissioned by the Kronos Quartet. Hack was the main language taught in MUSI 540, Computer Music 2, where students used it to create their final compositions. Shatin also began revising and adding to the tutorials for Hack, so that users can add their own scripts with functions in Common Lisp, and began developing a library of Lisp functions that generate Hack scripts, enabling the composer to algorithmically generate groups of events with desired characteristics rather than individually specifying each note event.
Noun Classification in Swahili
Noun Classification in Swahili
Contini-Morava, Ellen - Professor
Associate Fellow 1994
This is a report on a two-phase study of the semantics and syntax of noun classification in Swahili. Phase I, the topic of the present paper, is an investigation of the semantic structure of the noun classes, from a cognitive-semantic perspective. Data for this study include all the nouns from the Standard Swahili-English Dictionary (Johnson 1939), entered into a computer database and subcategorized according to over 75 semantic and morphological criteria. This paper proposes a semantic analysis of Classes 3, 7, 5, 9, and 11. A diagram of the semantic structure of each class is provided, showing relations of instantiation, metaphoric and metonymic extension within the class. Each diagram node is associated with a list of Swahili nouns exemplifying the relevant semantic category, which may be viewed by clicking on that portion of the diagram.
Piers Plowman Electronic Archive
Piers Plowman  Electronic Archive
Duggan, Hoyt - Professor
Resident Fellowship: 1994
The long-range goal of the Piers Plowman Electronic Archive is the creation of a multi-level, hyper-textually linked electronic archive of the textual tradition of all three versions of the fourteenth-century allegorical dream vision Piers Plowman.
The William Blake Archive
The William Blake Archive
Eaves, Morris - Professor, University of Rochester
Essick, Robert - Professor, UC Riverside
Viscomi, Joseph - G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Networked Associate Fellows 1994
In the broadest terms, the William Blake Archive is a contemporary response to the needs of this dispersed and various audience of readers and viewers and to the corresponding needs of the collections where Blake's original works are currently held. The Blake Archive was conceived as an international public resource that would provide unified access to major works of visual and literary art that are highly disparate, widely dispersed, and more and more often severely restricted as a result of their value, rarity, and extreme fragility.
The Pompeii Forum Project
The Pompeii Forum Project
Dobbins, John - Professor
Resident Fellowship: 1994
The Pompeii Forum Project is a collaborative research venture that is archaeologicaly based, heavily dependent upon advanced technology, and so conceived as to address broad issues in urban history and urban design. Evidence gathered to date challenges commonly held and widely published notions about the evolution of the forum, especially during the final years of the city's life. The goals are to provide the first systematic documentation of the architecture and decoration of the forum, to interpret evidence as it pertains to Pompeii's urban history, and to make wider contributions to both the history of urbanism and contemporary problems of urban design.
Dickinson Electronic Archives
Dickinson Electronic Archives
Smith, Martha Nell - Professor of English, Founding Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH)
Professor of English, Founding Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH)
The Dickinson Electronic Archives (DEA), a website devoted to the study of Emily Dickinson, her writing practices, writings directly influencing her work, and critical and creative writings generated by her work. The DEA is produced by the Dickinson Editing Collective, with four general editors working collaboratively with one another and with numerous coeditors, staff, and users.
The Complete Writings and Pictures of Dante Gabriel Rossetti
The Complete Writings and Pictures of Dante Gabriel Rossetti
McGann, Jerome - The John Stewart Bryan Professor Nineteenth and Twentieth Century, History and Theory of Texts
Resident Fellowship: 1993
The Rossetti Archive is a hypertextual instrument designed to facilitate the scholarly study of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, the painter, designer, writer, and translator who was, according to both John Ruskin and Walter Pater, the most important and original artistic force in the second half of the nineteenth century in Great Britain. This is the first of four planned installments of the Archive.
The Valley of the Shadow
The Valley of the Shadow
Ayers, Edward L. - Hugh P. Kelley Professor Of History
Resident Fellowship: 1993
The Valley Project details life in two American communities, one Northern and Southern, from the time of John Brown's Raid through the era of Reconstruction. In this digital archive you may explore thousands of original letters and diaries, newspapers and speeches, census and church records, left by men and women in Augusta County, Virginia, and Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Giving voice to hundreds of individual people, the Valley Project tells forgotten stories of life during the era of the Civil War.